Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Grenada
Report on certain political events
which occurred in Grenada 1976-1991

VOLUME ONE

PART 4

Section 8:

OBSTACLES TO HEALING AND RECONCILIATION IN GRENADA AS IDENTIFIED BY THE TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSION

UNWILLINGNESS TO RECONCILE

Another obstacle to healing and reconciliation in Grenada as identified by the T.R.C. is the lack of will and desire, and even the blatant refusal on the part of many—those who have done wrong to admit and accept responsibility for their wrong-doings, and those who have been wronged—to actually forgive and reconcile.

Accepting the fact I have done wrong, and expressing sorrow and remorse for my wrong-doings on the part of the wrong-doers; and acknowledging that something wrong has been done to me—on the part of victims, and having the will and desire to forgive, are both necessary for genuine healing and reconciliation.

Many people continue to hurt, not only because of what was actually done to them, but also because of how they were treated after the fact. When people have been wronged and they feel no sense of redress, then healing and reconciliation will remain a difficult thing, if not impossible.

RECOMMENDATION:

The T.R.C. recommends here that a special effort should be made by the political authority, and by other men and women of goodwill who are interested in the healing of the nation and reconciliation of the people, to reach out to the living victims and families of victims of the tragic events of the period under review, preferably on a personal level, and offer some form of consolation, compensation, or help where needed.

One of the sad things that was expressed to the T.R.C. during its encounters with victims and families of victims is that in some instances, many victims and families of victims have never been visited by, or reached out to, by any form of authority to find out what help they may need as a result of personal pain and loss or loss of loved ones.

There is a particularly sad example where the mother of one of those who were executed on the Fort on October 19th, 1983 and who was her only form of livelihood, has to date never been visited by or reached out to by any form of authority to find out what help she needs. She remains a mother in great grief and in great need. She remains an example of one who has not been treated justly after that tragic event. The victims and families of victims should never be placed on the heap of the forgotten.

The T.R.C. therefore, further recommends here, that no effort should be spared, and no tangible action be overlooked in order to redress the tragedies of the past. The living victims and the families of those who lost their lives must be treated justly, because justice fosters healing and reconciliation.

Next: Part Four, Section Nine      Back: Part Four, Section Seven

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